Monday, January 14, 2019

20 Ways to Earn Your Employees' Respect


The best bosses know how to earn respect from their employees. According to Inc., these are 20 things the most respected bosses do everyday:

1. They share their vision.
The most important thing a leader can do is provide his or her team with a goal that is worth their time. Granted, the boss doesn't always get to set the agenda, but a great one will advocate for something worthy, and ensure that he communicates it effectively and often.

2. They develop expertise.

What's more annoying than working for a boss who doesn't actually understand the job, and whose authority vests entirely in the job title? The boss doesn't have to be the number-one expert in every fact of the job--that might be impossible--but he or she had to be competent at all levels.

3. They respect people's time.


Great bosses have little tolerance for boring meetings, mandatory fun, and making others wait unnecessarily. They also avoid long-windedness when shorter remarks will do.

4. They set priorities.


When you try to focus on everything, you're not focusing on anything. A smart boss understands that, and realizes that lack of focus can easily metastasize when your lack of priorities means the team isn't moving in the right direction together.

5. They share information.


Some bosses parcel out information like misers, often because they're afraid that if their team had all the facts, they might not be able to lead. There are legitimate reasons to control the timing of information sharing, but overall the more transparent a boss can be, the more respect the team will ultimately have for him or her.

6. They make decisions.

Decisiveness. Super important. Enough said.

7. They offer praise.


People wonder how they're doing. Great bosses let them know, and they're especially vocal and public about it when they're doing well.

8. They demonstrate empathy.

Great bosses are able to see things through other people's eyes, especially their employees'. Of course this doesn't mean that they are pushovers, but it does mean that they're concerned about their team on multiple levels.

9. They offer thanks.


Building a culture of gratitude starts at the top. If the boss doesn't take time to offer thanks to those around him or her, why would we expect that anyone else would?

10. They pull everyone together.

You might have heard the phrase "gung ho." Reportedly, it derives from a World War II saying that combined two Chinese words meaning "work" and "together." A great boss recognizes the talents of members of his or her team, and strives to lead in a way that lets everyone maximize their effectiveness together.

11. They ask smart questions.

They double-check assumptions in a non-annoying but thorough way that sends the message that they're on top of things. They aren't willing to accept that things should be done a certain way just because that's how they've been done in he past.

12. They have respect for people's lives.


They also recognize that people are just that--people. Work has to be a priority, but that doesn't mean it's the only thing in their lives. They recognize that their employees have spouses, children, friends they need to care for, not to mention outside interests and ambitions.

13. They hire thoughtfully.


There's a saying: personnel is policy. In fact, this should arguably be the first item on the list. A leader's most important role is sometimes about assembling a team of great people--and, just as important, avoiding letting toxic people join.

14. They accept blame.

Ethical people accept blame for their failings. Maybe they don't dwell on it, but they accept it. Great bosses go a step further, accepting the collective blame when the team comes up short, and then guiding everyone to move forward.

15. They have a sense of humor.


Life is hilarious. Great bosses don't have to be cutups, but they do have to have a sense of humor. They recognize that the crisis of today is the joke of tomorrow.

16. They communicate effectively.

No mumbling, no backpedaling. Great bosses find the words to explain what they mean--and they back up what they say.

17. They model ethical behavior.

It's often true that more progress is made when we seek forgiveness than when we seek permission. However, there are rules, social norms, and basic decency. Great bosses strive to uphold them.

18. They celebrate wins.

Nobody likes a boss who thinks the only reward for great work should be more of the same. Great bosses look for milestones to celebrate--whether that means a 15-second recognition or a full-blown party.

19. They strive for excellence.

Because really, who wants to work for someone who strives simply to be adequate?

20. They make more leaders.

Great leaders don't just make happy followers--they inspire more leaders with their examples. Just as important: They're thrilled, not threatened, when members of their teams go on to even bigger and better things in life.

Monday, January 7, 2019

Why Bad Managers Makes Employees Quit


There are endless reasons why people decide to leave their jobs. Salary, location, convenience- the list goes on and on. However, often management is the reason why an employee decides to leave a company they otherwise would love to work for. According to Inc., here are five ways bosses drive their employees to quit:

1. Poor management performance.

We've heard it before and this report proves it once again: How employees feel about their direct supervisors matter. Employees who rate their supervisor's performance poorly are
four times as likely to be job hunting. Additionally, the study revealed that "40 percent of employees who do not rate their supervisor's performance highly have interviewed for a
new job in the last three months, compared to just 10 percent for those who do rate their supervisor highly."

2. Lack of employee recognition.

Something as simple (and free) as showing appreciation for your employees' contributions can be a difference maker. This, of course, would imply hiring and promoting more human-centered bosses who can recognize and express praise for their people. According to the report, nearly 22 percent of workers who don't feel recognized when they do great work have interviewed for a job in the last three months, compared to just 12.4 percent who do feel recognized.

3. Overworked employees.


The key solution to this driver of attrition is defined by an overused term that makes me cringe, but it's the absolute truth: work-life balance. In fact, employees who rate their work-life balance highly are 10 percent more likely to stay at their company. Yes, people crave work-life balance and it matters. If the risk of burnout looms, or more time is being spent away from family and personal priorities, you can bet your overworked employees are planning their exit strategy.

4. Company culture is not a priority.

According to the report, "Employees who rate their culture poorly are 24 percent more
likely to leave." In fact, the research found that culture has an even bigger impact on an employee's decision to stay or go than their benefits package. One important aspect of company culture is the way team members treat one another. Employees who say there's a low level of respect among colleagues are 26 percent more likely to quit their jobs.

5. No growth opportunities.
It was found that employees who feel they are progressing in their career are 20 percent more likely to stay at their companies in one year's time. On the flip side, employees who don't feel supported in their professional goals are three times more likely to be looking for a new job, according to the research.

The results of this study bring home the point that good leadership and a high-performance culture--one that values people as human beings--will time and time again reverse the attrition problem.

If execs and HR teams can align their employee-retention strategies to human-centered engagement efforts that focus on meeting the needs of people, and if they can create pathways for the personal and career growth of their employees, you can bet that you will witness happier, more productive work environments.

Monday, December 31, 2018

Worst Passwords of 2018

SplashData recently released their list of the worst passwords of 2018 based on lists of leaked passwords. Every year, millions of people put themselves at risk by selecting common words or keyboard tricks as their passwords. Although these are easy to remember, they also make it easy for hackers to break into your accounts and steal your identity.

Below are the top 25 worst passwords as taken from SplashData's list. If you use any of these passwords, do yourself a favor and change them before it's too late!


Rank 2018's Worst Passwords

  1. 123456 
  2. password 
  3. 123456789
  4. 12345678 
  5. 12345 
  6. 111111 
  7. 1234567
  8. sunshine 
  9. qwerty 
  10. iloveyou 
  11. princess 
  12. admin 
  13. welcome 
  14. 666666 
  15. abc123 
  16. football 
  17. 123123 
  18. monkey 
  19. 654321 
  20. !@#$%^&* 
  21. charlie 
  22. aa123456 
  23. donald 
  24. password1 
  25. qwerty123 

Monday, November 26, 2018

How to Get the Job of Your Dreams

Once you figure out what your dream is, you shouldn't let anything stop you from reaching that goal. Here are some tips from Inc. to help you get the job of your dreams:


1. Find the company you want to work for.
Obvious, right? Not really. Many job seekers respond to as many job postings as possible, hoping the numbers will be on their side.
But shotgun resume submissions result in hiring managers sifting through dozens of candidates to find the right person. (Good luck emerging from that particular pile.)
To show the hiring manager you are the right candidate, you have to do the work. Instead of shot-gunning your resume, put in the time to determine a company you definitely want to work for -- both in terms of the job and cultural fit.
2. Really know the company.
Pretend I'm the hiring manager. "I would love to work for you," you say. What I actually hear is, "I would love for you to pay me."
You can't possibly know if you want to work for my company unless you know a lot about my company; that's the difference between just wanting a job and wanting an actual role in a business.
Talk to friends, relatives, vendors, customers... anyone you can find. Check out management and employees on social media. When you know the people, you know the company. Learn as much as you can, then leverage that knowledge.
3. Determine how you will make an immediate impact in the role.
Many companies see training as a necessary evil. Training takes time, money, effort, all of which are in short supply. An ideal new hire can be productive immediately.
While you don't need to be able to do everything required in the job, it helps if the company can see an immediate return on their hiring investment. (Remember, hiring you is an investment that needs to generate a return.)
Identify one or two important things you can contribute from day one.
4. Don't just tell. Show.
Put what you can offer on display. If you're a programmer, mock up a new application. If you want a sales position, create a plan for how you'll target a new market or customer base, or describe how you will implement marketing strategies the business doesn't currently use.
A tell and show is your chance to prove you know the company and what you can offer. Your initiative will be impressive and you'll go a long way toward overcoming concerns that you're all hat and no cattle.
Is it fair you're doing a little work on spec? Should you have to create a mockup or plan to get the job? Probably not, but doing so will set you apart.
Never let "fair" -- when the only person "disadvantaged" is you -- get in the way of achieving your goals.
5. Use a referral as a reinforcement.
Business is all about relationships. We've all made bad hiring decisions, so a referral from someone we trust is like gold.
You may have to dig deep into your network or even forge new connections, but the effort will be worth it.
Knowing that someone we trust is willing to vouch for you is a data point that often tips the decision scale toward giving you an interview, and even giving you the job.
6. Be the one who knocks.
Yep: Channel your inner Walter White.
Don't wait to be called for an interview. Don't even wait for an opening to be posted; after all, you've identified ways you can immediately help the company you want to work for. Wrangle an introduction, meet with someone who can actually influence the hiring decision, and pitch away.
Think it won't work? It will -- as long as you show the person you contact how they will also benefit. Say, "I really want to work for your company. I know you're in charge of social-media marketing and I've developed a data-driven way to analyze activities, ROI, brand awareness, I'd love to take you to lunch and show you. If you hate my ideas, at least you got a free lunch. If you love them, you learned something. What do you have to lose?"
A friend of mine who runs a tech company has hired four people who approached him in a similar fashion. He's a go-getter; he loves hiring go-getters. And he loves when they find him.
Just make sure you go straight to describing how the company will benefit from hiring you. Say, "Your website is good, and I can make it even better. Here are changes I will make in the first month, and here is how those changes will improve conversions and SEO results. And here's a mockup I created of a new site design."
Approach people right and they will pay attention -- especially entrepreneurs and small-business owners. I don't know any smart people who won't drop everything to learn how to improve their business.
7. Assert yourself.
Many people are poor interviewers. That's especially true of small-business owners; many are terrible interviewers. (As a friend of mine says, "I don't work in HR. I run a business.")
So be direct and to the point. Explain what you can do. Describe your background. Don't talk about what the job will mean to you; talk about how the company will benefit from hiring you. Show you know working for their company is different (every company thinks they're different) and how you're excited by the challenge. Sell yourself: use what you know about the company and how you will make an impact to back up your pitch.
8. Ask for the job.
Most people don't mind being closed. Plus, a decision put off until tomorrow is a decision added to the to-do list; no one wants more on their plate.
If you truly know you want the job -- and by this point, you should -- ask for it. You have nothing to lose and everything to gain. Who knows: if you've worked hard to truly set yourself apart, you might get hired on the spot.
I liked when people asked for the job. Most hiring managers do. Who doesn't love initiative and drive?

Monday, November 12, 2018

Moving Forward From Mistakes

Everyone makes mistakes, some bigger than others. More important than the mistake itself is how you move forward after a setback. Check out these tips straight from Inc. to learn how to get back on track after any mistake:

1. Take full responsibility.

The only way to claim power in a difficult situation is to take full responsibility for the outcome you are experiencing. This is not to blame yourself, as many of us have that 20-20 hindsight, but to take a good critical (not criticizing) look as to how it happened and how you can be proactive in moving forward. Blaming others only makes you feel less in control and more anxious about taking another risk.

2. Find the gold.

In every setback there is an opportunity or what I call "the gold" that will bring you more success through self-awareness and experience. There is something you needed to learn in order to get to the next level of your business. For every business owner the gold is different.


Often business owners will discover that a financial setback reveals a pattern of over-giving or undercharging which would have gone unnoticed if a cash flow crisis did not occur. Sometimes the gold is in changing strategy and other times the setback is about the personal growth of the business owner.

3. Reset your vision.

When a slowdown or failure occurs, it is an excellent time to revisit your goals and reset your vision. Failure is not a period but a comma. When you are going at rapid speed, you can get off track and the failure gives you that comma, the pause, to re-evaluate your vision and what you are trying to accomplish.

For example, our business was running on autopilot for years. We had the same lead generation and sales funnel, and it worked effortlessly. Over the past few years there has been a change in technology and the old sales process was not as effective. We, as owners, were changing and growing but our business was still running on old ideas and sales started to slow down. This was the perfect opportunity for us to look at who our target market was and where we wanted to go long-term. We realized how we needed this slow down to stop and reset our vision.

4. Celebrate small wins.

The best way to regain momentum is by creating small wins for yourself. The key to controlling the win is to be non-attached to the result of your action. Celebrate your actions as a success in themselves.

In other words, face difficulties in your business with non-judgment. Avoid thinking of setbacks as losing or failing and you will not be emotionally-tied to the rollercoaster of entrepreneurship. When you can take advantage of the down times you can emerge even stronger and create a legacy that lasts.

Monday, October 8, 2018

Worlco's Guide to Phone Interviews



Phone interviews can be very stressful. Without the benefit of seeing your interviewer in person, it can be hard to pick up on body language or social cues. Even worse, some people neglect to take phone interviews seriously and pick up the phone completely unprepared. Below is Worlco’s list of phone interview tips!

DO:
  • Pay attention to enunciation and tone- Say each word separately, paying attention to your tone of voice. Assume off the bat that the phone service will not be perfect, leaving you to work extra hard to have each word heard.
  • Speak slowly- Have you ever been on the phone with a friend as they rushed through a story, merging words together and mumbling to the point that you had no clue what they just told you? Don’t make that mistake!
  • Refer to your resume and the job description- One positive of phone interviews is that you can keep your interview and the company’s website/ job description in front of you the entire time. Check your notes often to make sure every answer is perfect.
  • Prepare the same way you would for an in-person interview- Just because the interview is on the phone doesn’t mean it’s any less serious! Practice in advance and study up on the company. The day of your call wake up early and dress in your go-to interview outfit, so you can feel as ready as possible.
  • Say thank you and follow up- Just like you should prepare for a phone interview the same way as an in-person meeting, you should follow typical interview protocol after. Thank your interviewer for their time at the end of your call and be sure to send a thank you note.

DON’T:
  •  Take long breaks between words or sentences- Long pauses will have your interviewer checking their reception or wondering if you’re confused by their question. Pauses over the phone don’t feel as natural as they might in person!  
  • Take the call in public or a noisy area- The last thing you need during your phone interview is a distraction! Take the call at home in a private room where your family or roommates know not to disturb you.
  •  Put the phone on speaker- While it might be nice to have your hands free during your call, having your phone on speaker may produce a loud feedback or echo. Use headphones with a speaker if you’ll feel more comfortable not holding your phone.
  •  Cut your interviewer off- Without body language or other cues it can be hard to tell when your interviewer is finished speaking. While you don’t want to wait too long to answer a question, you should allow at least one full second after your interviewer has finished a question to make sure they’re done speaking.


Monday, October 1, 2018

Are Bad Hires Draining Your Company?


According to an article posted by Inc., only one out of five new employees are successful. Bad new hires can lead to lasting problems for companies, more than just a waste of money and drain in morale. If your company is having a problem with bad hires, be sure to reach out to Worlco Computer Resources so we can help you get your team back on track! 

 Here are Inc.’s tips to help your company stay motivated after a bad employee joins the team:

1. Have a continuous hiring strategy in place.


The costs of a bad hire add up quickly--including training and salary costs, as well as costs associated with other employees picking up a bad employee's slack. According to data from the U.S. Department of Labor, the costs of a bad hire can add up to 30 percent of the hire's annual salary.
In some cases, you might keep a bad hire on board to stay fully staffed--only to finally hire someone when it's gotten out of hand. Doing so can have a negative impact on your team's productivity and profitability.
To avoid keeping bad hires on your team for long, have a strategy in place to continuously hire--especially for roles you know will open up throughout the year. It'll help you quickly replace bad hires and build a network of talent to staff up as your team grows.
Keep jobs posted on your career site--even if you don't have an immediate opening. If a strong candidate comes along, you can offer an informational interview. If the interview goes well, you might even decide to hire the candidate before you have an immediate need. If not, you'll have a pool of talent to tap into when you need to make an urgent hire--like when you let go of a bad hire or suddenly experience business growth.

2. Rethink your hiring process.

If you notice your team has made several bad hires in recent memory, it's likely time to rethink your hiring process. Many businesses make the mistake of hiring employees too quickly to fill open roles. Hiring the right employee is much more important than simply filling a seat.
Rather than simply manually reviewing applicants and completing one or two interviews, your hiring process should include several verification steps to determine whether or not each candidate is truly a fit for your team. For example, you can use prescreen surveys to gauge whether or not candidates meet the requirements for the role before you even move forward with an interview.
Other verification steps, such as reference and background checks, can help your team feel even more confident in the candidate before extending an offer. That'll ultimately decrease your risk of making another bad hire.

3. Check in with your team.

Check in with your employees following a bad hire. Individual team members often end up getting overworked due to a bad hire who isn't performing, or even mistreated by a bad hire who isn't a culture fit for your team.
Ask your managers to reach out to employees about any challenges they've faced with the bad hire. Collect feedback about what the company can do to ensure the rest of the team continues to be excited to do great work. Doing so will make everyone feel valued and motivated.
Bad hires pose a risk for throwing any team off track. With the right strategy in place, you can ensure your team remains productive.